Recent Cleaning Posts

Do You Have an Odor Coming From Your Fridge?

8/31/2018 (Permalink)

Cleaning Do You Have an Odor Coming From Your Fridge? Smelly Fridge?

Step 1: Empty Fridge 
Even if you think you’ve identified the item causing the odor, you need to empty the entire contents of the refrigerator and freezer. If you have a second fridge, stash perishables there. If the odor is the result of a power outage, don’t take any chances by hanging onto food that may have spoiled. A refrigerator will keep food at safe temperatures for about 4 hours, if it’s left unopened, according to the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Services.

Step 2: Hand wash Bins and Shelves
Take out the shelves, bins, crisper drawers, ice trays, and any other loose components and wash them.

Step 3: Deodorize the Interior
Now you’re ready to wash the inside of the refrigerator.  Stay away from abrasive cleaners and pads, which can scratch the interior of the refrigerator.

Step 4: Air it Out
Here’s where the patience piece comes in. For best results, you need to unplug the refrigerator, leave the door open, and air it out for at least one day. 

Step 5: Clean the Evaporator
If there’s a lasting funk that just won’t go away, chances are the refrigerator smells have permeated the evaporator coil, which produces cold air for the fridge and freezer. The coil, along with the fan that distributes the air, are typically located on the back wall of the freezer.

For more tips please visit:

https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-get-rid-of-funky-refrigerator-smells/

SERVPRO Offers Free Vandalism Cleanup for Victims of Hate Crimes in Aurora

12/27/2016 (Permalink)

Cleaning SERVPRO Offers Free Vandalism Cleanup for Victims of Hate Crimes in Aurora Vandalism spray painted on the door of an Aurora home.

Three more hate attacks targeting African-American families in Aurora have upset residents and compelled police on Monday to step up patrols and appeal to the public for help.

The authorities have been investigating after other recent attacks. Police Chief Nick Metz, Mayor Steve Hogan and other city leaders have declared hate crimes will not be tolerated in Aurora, which bills itself as the safest large city in Colorado.

Over the weekend, vandals left threatening notes and spray-painted racial slurs — “KKK” and the like — on three apartment doors near the 6700 block of South Rivera Court.

“People are scared,” one resident said, asking that her name not be printed for fear her family could be targeted.

“Since the election, people feel like they are now privileged to go after minorities and get away with it. And I am scared retaliation will happen if we speak out and no protection will be provided for victims by our apartment complex.”

The attackers may be posing as missionaries and carpet cleaner salespeople, moving door to door, to learn racial information about residents who then are targeted, the resident said. In addition to spray-painted scrawls on seven doors, the attacks this past weekend included threatening messages on notes, she said. Some victims apparently did not report crimes to police.

Aurora police have stepped up patrols, agency spokeswoman Diana Cooley said.

Police on Monday posted a bulletin on their departmental Facebook page saying “these bias-motivated crimes will continue to be a high priority for the Aurora Police Department.”

The recent crimes “all have that pattern — the spray painting and note,” Cooley said. “This is going to alarm some folks. It is something we take seriously. If you are a resident and see something suspicious, please contact the police department.”

The attacks Saturday and Sunday followed attacks Nov. 22 and Nov. 29 on a different African-American family. City leaders on Nov. 30 lamented that contentious presidential election politics were spilling into the community and vowed an aggressive investigation.

Aurora residents have reported at least nine bias-related crimes since the Nov. 8 election and Metz has said he believes other incidents may be happening that haven’t been reported.

Nationwide, police have reported surges of hate crimes since the election. The Southern Poverty Law Center documented 867 hate crime incidents during the 10 days after the election, including 21 in Colorado. The Colorado crimes targeted immigrants, African-Americans, women and children.

The Littleton franchise of the clean-up company SERVPRO is offering its services to erase the physical damange of vandalism for free to victims of hate crimes in Aurora, SERVPRO administrator Kimber Tornes said. “We unfortunately can’t erase the damage to their hearts and minds.”

 

Source: http://www.denverpost.com/2016/12/12/aurora-police-step-up-patrols-appeal-for-help-after-three-more-hate-attacks/

Preparing Your Home For Winter

10/20/2015 (Permalink)

Source: esurance blog

blog.esurance.com

Preparing Your Home for Winter: 8 Fall Maintenance Hacks for Cold-Weather Comfort

We all look forward to fall’s festivities. But taking the time to prepare your home for winter (before it arrives) can help ensure you’re cozying up by the fireside — worry-free — once cold weather rolls around. Find out how with these 8 simple hacks.

 

Ahhh, fall is finally here! The leaves are changing, there’s a crisp coolness in the air, and our favorite pumpkin-flavored treats line store shelves once more. Decorating and meal-prepping might be the first things on your mind when it comes to preparing your home for the colder months — but the National Weather Service is predicting strong winter storms that could affect homeowners across the country this year.

Here are 8 important fall maintenance tips that can make all the difference once winter’s first freeze hits.

1. Clear out your gutters

All those colorful leaves falling from the trees sure are pretty — but they also pile up pretty quickly in your home’s gutters.

Excess debris can lead to clogs (or ice dams in wintery conditions), which can prevent gutters from draining properly. In turn, there’s a chance water could seep into your home since it has nowhere else to escape to, causing a multitude of issues like damage to your valuables, mold growth, and even structural rot.

Before winter hits, clear your house’s gutters of leaves and any other debris that might’ve accumulated during the summer months. It also helps to run water through the gutters afterward to check for any leaks or misalignments that could damage your home.

Related link: Fall Home Maintenance Tricks You’d Be Crazy Not To Try

2. Inspect for air leaks

Things like damaged weather stripping and small cracks in your home’s structure allow warm air to escape, causing your heater to go into overdrive to keep your place warm.

The solution to your chilly house and high utility bills is pretty simple: before it gets wintery outside, inspect your home’s windows, doorways, and any other places where air might be able to enter or exit.

You can use caulking to stop leaks in the stationary components of your home (like a crack in your doorframe) and weather stripping to insulate the moving components (like windows and doors).

Related link: Top 6 Reasons to Winterize Your Home

3. Have your heating system checked

Home just doesn’t feel like home if a malfunctioning heater is leaving you with the chills. And in parts of the country with freezing temps, it can be a much more serious situation.

That’s why it’s wise to have a licensed contractor come out to inspect your heater at least once a year, especially before the weather outside becomes frightful.

4. Prepare your pipes

Get to know where the pipelines in your house are located and make sure to inspect them every autumn (at least).

Simply patch any small leaks with heat tape to help reduce weaknesses that might cause the pipe to burst in freezing weather. And you can further protect any exposed outdoor pipes by insulating them with foam or rubber pipe wraps, which can be found at your local hardware store.

For larger leaks or pipeline problems, it’s always a good idea to play it safe and call the pros.

5. Drain any outside faucets and irrigation systems 

Speaking of bursting pipes, it’s important to pay attention to the water systems immediately outside your place too. Undrained water in outdoor faucets and irrigation systems can expand when frozen and cause a pipe to burst.

Draining faucets is simple enough: just pack away your garden hoses in the garage for the winter and let out any remaining water — easy as that!

Irrigation systems, on the other hand, often vary in the way they should be maintained. It’s best to call a professional who has experience with underground water systems, just to cover all your bases.

6. Have your roof inspected

For your safety, a full-blown roof inspection should be done professionally. The cost to hire an inspector can be as low as a little over $200 and can prevent seriously hefty repair expenses down the line if a winter storm wreaks havoc on your roof and you don’t have sufficient insurance coverage to cover repair costs.

Reinforcing your roof now can help you avoid a whole host of hazards, like air and water leaks, water damage, mold, and more — all of which could put a damper on your seasonal festivities (and your wallet).

7. Restock cold-weather home essentials

Key items like rock salt or kitty litter, snow shovels, space heaters, extra batteries, and heated blankets can help make your home both more functional and comfortable during wintertime. Stock up on these helpful winter wares ahead of time to help avoid any extra hassle or stress come holiday season.

Related link: Tips for Before, During, and After a Winter Power Outage

8. Take a peek at your homeowners insurance

Believe it or not, your homeowners policy could come to the rescue for a whole host of cold-weather mishaps.

Whether a hailstorm leaves holes in your roof, a vandal breaks into your home and destroys valuables while you’re out holiday shopping, or the weight of snow and ice results in structural damage to your house,homeowners insurance could help pay to repair or replace your losses.